A True Friend

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Posted in Love | Posted on 12-06-2014

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FHE Scripture

Scripture

 

Matthew 7: 12

12- Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.

 

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

Jesus Said Love Everyone–Primary Song #61 or Love One Another Hymn 308

Jesus Said Love Everyone

1. Jesus said love ev’ryone;
Treat them kindly, too.
When your heart is filled with love,
Others will love you.

Love One Another

1. As I have loved you,
Love one another.
This new commandment:
Love one another.
By this shall men know
Ye are my disciples,
If ye have love
One to another.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* Start by telling the story of two boys delivering newspapers (Improvement Era, Dec 1969, p. 51). Discuss qualities of a friend and the importance of being a friend to all.

Two boys were delivering newspapers on their bicycles. One of the bicycles hit a rock, and the boy flew off the bike in one direction and the newspapers in another. The second boy rode up laughing and teasing. As a neighbor came to the first boy’s assistance, the second boy rode on down the street.

Seeing the boy’s pride was hurt more than his body, the neighbor said, “It’s kind of a low blow to have your friend laugh when you’ve had a bad spill, isn’t it?” As the boy packed the newspapers back in place, he replied, “He isn’t my friend—he’s my brother.”

1- What was wrong?
2- How should we treat our brothers and sisters?
3- How should we treat friends?
4- What does a good friend do?
5- How can you be a good friend?

Testify of the importance of  friendship and how we need to strive to be friends with everyone.

 

*For Teenagers or Adults* Discuss qualities of a friend. Read about the friendship of Jonathan and David. Brainstorm what a true friend is and testify of the importance of friendship.

Start by making a list of qualities a best friend possesses (maybe even share examples of best friends).

Read of the friendship between Jonathan and David in 1 Samuel 18: 1-4.

Complete the following sentence “A true friend is a person who……”

Read Proverbs 17:17 (a friend loveth at all times)

Also read what Jesus has commanded of us in John 13: 34-35.

As we love others, we become their friends. It is important for us to love our neighbor and strive to become friends with everyone.

Testify of the importance of  friendship.

 

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Fruit Cake or Watermelon Sorbet

Fruit Cake

Ingredients:

Large seedless watermelon
Other fresh fruit, such as melon balls, kiwi slices, and berries

Instructions:

1- Start by slicing the watermelon into wedges and then arrange them in a stack of circles (rinds facing out) to create a cake shape, as shown. Decorate the cake with the other fruits.

 

Watermelon Sorbet

Ingredients:

1 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
4 cups watermelon chunks
1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

Instructions:

1- Combine the water and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer it gently for 5 minutes. Pour the liquid into an 8-inch square glass baking pan.

2- Puree the watermelon chunks in a blender, then strain the puree into a large bowl. Measure out 2 cups of the watermelon juice and stir it into the sugar syrup along with the lemon juice.

3- Place the pan in the freezer for 1 hour. Then stir the mixture with a wooden spoon and allow it to freeze for another 45 minutes. Repeat this process once, and then allow the mixture to freeze through (another couple hours or so).

4- Thaw the ice slightly so that you can transfer it to a chilled blender. Pulse the machine just until the ice is slushy, periodically scraping down the sides. Spoon the sorbet into chilled bowls and serve at once. Makes 6 servings.

 

(Recipes taken from Familyfun.go.com)

 

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

 

1- Play Firefly (Flashlight Game).

2- Play Sponge Brigade.

 

 

Classic Lesson: Life After Death

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Posted in Easter, Family | Posted on 24-02-2014

Tags: , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture


Matthew 10: 29-31

29- Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.
30- But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.
31- Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn


God Loved Us, So He Sent His Son Hymn 187 or My Heavenly Father Loves Me–Primary Song #228

God Loved Us, So He Sent His Son Hymn 187

1.God loved us, so he sent his Son,
Christ Jesus, the atoning One,
To show us by the path he trod
The one and only way to God.

2. He came as man, though Son of God,
And bowed himself beneath the rod.
He died in holy innocence,
A broken law to recompense.

3. Oh, love effulgent, love divine!
What debt of gratitude is mine,
That in his off’ring I have part
And hold a place within his heart.

4. In word and deed he doth require
My will to his, like son to sire,
Be made to bend, and I, as son,
Learn conduct from the Holy One.

5. This sacrament doth represent
His blood and body for me spent.
Partaking now is deed for word
That I remember him, my Lord.

My Heavenly Father Loves Me–Primary Song #228

1. Whenever I hear the song of a bird
Or look at the blue, blue sky,
Whenever I feel the rain on my face
Or the wind as it rushes by,
Whenever I touch a velvet rose
Or walk by a lilac tree,
I’m glad that I live in this beautiful world
Heavenly Father created for me.

2. He gave me my eyes that I might see
The color of butterfly wings.
He gave me my ears that I might hear
The magical sound of things.
He gave me my life, my mind, my heart:
I thank him reverently
For all his creations, of which I’m a part.
Yes, I know Heavenly Father loves me.

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* Read the following story from the Friend (April 2011 Friend “Spring’s Promise”) and discuss the questions listed below.

 

Spring was on its way. Flowers pushed their way through the thin layer of snow on the ground. Lyndsey’s mom hung a yellow berry wreath on the front door.

One day, Lyndsey came into the kitchen where Mom was cleaning. “Mom, what are those scratching sounds?” Lyndsey asked.

“I don’t hear anything,” Mom said. “Where do you hear them?”

“They’re coming from the front door,” Lyndsey said.

“It’s probably just the wind blowing our wreath against the door,” Mom said.

Over the next few days, mysterious noises kept coming from the front door. Lyndsey’s sister, Sarah, noticed a couple of robins flying back and forth from the front porch carrying twigs and bits of paper. Lyndsey’s brother, Westley, noticed the birds chirping loudly at him whenever he played basketball in the driveway.

A couple of weeks later, the weather outside grew warmer. Daffodils nodded their golden heads. The strange noises stopped. Everyone forgot about the mystery.

Mom wanted to replace the berry wreath on the front door with an Easter decoration. She lifted the wreath off the door and carried it inside. Lyndsey was coloring at the table. Mom started to lay the wreath on the table when she suddenly stopped moving.

“What’s the matter?” Lyndsey asked.

Mom gently put the wreath on the floor and leaned it against the wall. “Lyndsey, there is a bird nest on top of the wreath,” she said.

Lyndsey hopped out of her chair to look. As she stepped toward the wreath, she saw something at her feet. On the floor lay three tiny blue eggs. But there was still one egg that hadn’t fallen out of the nest. Mom put on her cleaning gloves. She carefully picked up the three eggs and put them back into the nest with the fourth. Then she hung the wreath back on the front door.

Over the next few days, Lyndsey, Sarah, and Westley peeked into the nest. They noticed that there were only three eggs. When they asked what had happened to the fourth egg, Mom said she would explain during family home evening that night.

After dinner, the family gathered in the living room. They were going to have a lesson about Easter. Dad explained that Jesus Christ died so we might live again with Him and Heavenly Father someday. Heavenly Father loves all of us, including all of the creatures on the earth. He even notices when a little bird falls from its nest.

Dad asked Sarah to read Matthew 10:29–31: “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.”

Mom explained that when the eggs fell out of the nest, one of them had broken and the bird was not able to survive. But the other three eggs were fine.

“If Heavenly Father loves that little bird that died, imagine how much He must have loved us to send His Only Begotten Son, Jesus Christ,” Mom said. “He sacrificed His perfect Son so we could live with Him again someday.”

Lyndsey, Sarah, and Westley watched the birds hatch and grow strong. The mother and father robins helped their babies learn to fly. Finally, they left the nest. But the little robin family stayed in their yard all summer, singing happily to Lyndsey’s family.

Discuss these questions as a family:
What was the noise at the door?
What was on top of the wreath?
What happened to the fourth egg?
Will the bird that died live again?
Can we all live again after we die?

Testify of the blessing from our Heavenly Father and our Savior that we can all live again.

*For Teenagers or Adults* Read the following story from the New Era (New Era Aug 1991 “A Circle of No Good-byes”) and discuss the questions listed below.

Derek Rasmussen frantically raced his car down the wooded turnpike. No one had expected the end to come this quickly, least of all Derek, and now he wondered if he could reach his grandfather in time.

He rounded a bend and, approaching the last toll booth before the city, slowed to a stop. It shouldn’t be happening this way, Derek mused as he dug into his front pocket for a quarter and dropped it into the box. When I was little, it seemed like Grandpa would live forever.

Maybe it was the energy and vitality that had filled Grandpa Reilly’s life, but Derek had never been able to imagine his grandfather dying. When his Primary teachers had taught of people living to the age of a tree during the millennium and then being transformed in the twinkling of an eye, Derek had thought of Grandpa Reilly—even though Grandpa wasn’t a member of the Church then.

Derek’s grandfather had never been particularly religious. “Churches do more evil than good,” he had once told Derek. “They’re so full of hypocrites that the good Lord probably couldn’t stand them, much less approve of them. I’ll keep to my own worship, thank you very much,” he said, closing all religious discussion on that note. He tolerated Grandma Reilly’s Catholic faith and even helped her take their children to Christmas and Easter services, but that was as far as his devotion extended.

Perhaps that was why Grandpa objected when his youngest daughter, who was attending a university thousands of miles away in the West, met a returned LDS missionary named Rasmussen and decided to marry him and become a Mormon. He questioned her to determine if her conversion was based upon conviction, rather than upon a whim sparked by her fiance. When it became apparent that her testimony of her new beliefs was firm, he had grudgingly pronounced his blessing upon both the baptism and the marriage.

Grandpa Reilly had given his blessing, but as time passed the Rasmussens were never sure if he completely approved or not. Derek’s parents moved into a country house only a mile away from Grandma and Grandpa Reilly’s rambling farm, and the Rasmussen children spent almost as much time in their grandparent’s home as they did their own. As the children told their grandpa about their normal activities, mention of church activities would inadvertently spring up.

At first nothing came of it, but soon it became apparent that something about the LDS church bothered Grandpa. When any subject relating to the Church was broached, Derek’s grandfather became uncharacteristically silent, and his usual energetic countenance transformed into one of tenseness, almost sorrow. To keep from offending Grandpa Reilly, Derek’s family scrambled to avoid any mention of the Mormon church; with the two missions and a temple marriage that would come even before Derek’s mission, however, it became impossible to be completely quiet about the gospel.

Grandma Reilly died when Derek was 13, and Grandpa knew for perhaps the first time the pangs of sorrow and loneliness. Looking for companionship and understanding, he found in his youngest grandson the quiet, introspective friend that he needed. From that point on he and Derek became inseparable, spending long hours fishing, working on the farm, or sometimes just talking.

Derek had noticed something interesting in the time that he spent with his grandfather: Grandpa Reilly would not say good-bye, no matter what the situation was. When Derek’s mother called him home for dinner at the end of the day, Grandpa always saw him to the door; if Derek said good-bye, his grandfather would gently correct him. “I’ll see you again, so it’s only ‘so long’ for us,” he would say with a smile. “I said good-bye to your grandma when she left, and I don’t plan on saying it again until my time has come, too.” As Derek grew older he saw the logic in it, and soon for him, too, there were no more good-byes.

It was right before Derek’s mission that he began to wonder if he was wrong about Grandpa Reilly’s attitude toward the Church. Derek, who was almost 19, had just graduated from high school and had also received a full-ride scholarship to a prestigious college. The school would not hold his scholarship for the two years that he would be serving a mission, and suddenly he had second thoughts about making that great of a sacrifice for the Lord. Derek had a firm testimony of the gospel’s truthfulness, but could he throw his education and the rest of his life away for the Church?

Derek eventually decided that, realistically, he could not afford to sacrifice his education and career to knock on doors in some far corner of the world for two years. He told his grandfather about his plans first, thinking that Grandpa Reilly would secretly be pleased at the news.

“I’m taking that scholarship, Grandpa,” Derek said. “The time’s not right for a mission.”

“You’re what?” Grandpa demanded. “So what makes you up and decide all of a sudden that you’re not going on a mission?”

“Look, Grandpa,” Derek started to explain patiently, “I know that everyone will be upset, but I have to do what’s best for me. The school won’t hold my scholarship if I serve a mission, and I have to think about the long run.”

“Don’t tell me about the long run!” Grandpa Reilly exploded. “You’re going to regret not going for the rest of your life. A career won’t make much difference then. Don’t think about other people, either. You’re not serving a mission for your father or mother or your bishop or for anyone else; you’re doing it for yourself and the Lord and the people that you teach, and those are the people that count. I may not know much about religion or your church, but I do know that a mission is the best thing that could happen to you, and you’ll be denying yourself the chance of a lifetime if you don’t go.”

Shocked by the unexpectedness and force of his grandfather’s outburst, Derek could do nothing but stare in astonishment. Derek had never known Grandpa Reilly felt that way about the missions his grandsons served. When Derek finally collected his wits enough to further press the matter, Grandpa would say nothing more about the subject.

A week later, Derek sent in his papers and also mailed a letter to the college saying that he had to decline their scholarship so that he could serve a mission. Shortly after he received his mission call to Portugal, the college wrote to inform him that the admissions board would be pleased to reconsider a scholarship offer after his mission.

Grandpa Reilly had never been to one of his grandsons’ missionary farewells before, but at Derek’s invitation he decided to come to this particular farewell—“Just to see what all the fuss is about,” he told his daughters. So when Derek began to speak at the end of the program, he grandfather watched from the fourth row.

“I’d like to take this opportunity to thank someone who has helped me in more ways than he’ll ever know,” Derek said. “That person is my grandpa Reilly. There isn’t much that I could do to repay him for his help, except to give him my most treasured possession: my testimony of the truthfulness of this gospel.”

Derek had to pause for a few moments because tears were rolling down his cheeks, and he could no longer trust himself to speak. He regained his composure, then cleared his throat and plunged on. “I know by the power of the Holy Ghost that this is the gospel of Jesus Christ and that by following its principles and ordinances, we and our loved ones will be able to return to Heavenly Father and live with him forever. I know of no other truth more simple or precious.”

Then Derek picked up a Book of Mormon. “Because of your advice, Grandpa, I’m going to be teaching the gospel to the Portuguese people. Before I leave, though, I challenge you to read this book. I’d like you to be my first investigator.” Derek noticed that his grandpa, too, was crying.

After the meeting, Grandpa Reilly confided to him, “For 20 years I’ve wanted someone to say that to me, but I was too stubborn to ask for myself. I’m just grateful that I have a grandson who will give me that chance.”

Derek baptized and confirmed his grandfather two weeks later, three days before he entered the Missionary Training Center. Two years later, when he came home from Portugal, he had the privilege of going through the Washington, D.C., temple with his family and seeing Grandpa sealed to Grandma Reilly for time and all eternity. After the ceremony, Grandpa looked over at Derek and smiled. “She approves,” he said, pointing upwards.

It seemed almost as if Grandpa Reilly had willed himself to hold on just long enough for Derek to return from the mission field. Soon after the temple experience Grandpa contracted pneumonia and became seriously ill.

The Rasmussens fasted and prayed for him continually, but it soon became apparent that Grandpa would slip away from them. When Derek’s father gave Grandpa Reilly a priesthood blessing, he could utter no promises of health, just words of comfort that he would not suffer; he also felt a peaceful feeling that all was right, that Grandpa was soon to be reunited with his wife.

Derek had not realized how soon that reunion would be until his mother called to tell him that Grandpa Reilly would probably not live until sunset. Grandpa had asked for Derek as he slipped away from consciousness. Now, as Derek pulled into the parking lot, he could do little but fervently hope that he had made it in time to see his grandfather.

When Derek entered the hospital room, he found his family by Grandpa’s bedside. His breath caught in shock. Derek had not seen Grandpa Reilly in two days, and in that time his grandfather’s countenance had become haggard and thin. Still, when Grandpa opened his eyes and smiled, Derek saw traces of the love for life that had been his grandfather’s most dominant trait.

“Looks like I’ll be heading home pretty soon, Derek,” Grandpa grinned wryly, although it obviously hurt to do so. “You want to wish me a safe trip?” The old man coughed violently, and Derek grimaced at the suffering that his grandfather was enduring.

“You’re not going to die, Grandpa,” Derek blurted out, willing to say anything if it would prolong the inevitable. “We’ll fight this thing together and you’ll get better and …”

“You know as well as I do that I’ve made it as far as I’m going to on this earth,” Grandpa Reilly quietly cut Derek off. “I’m ready to go, and your grandmother misses me. This time, I guess, it really is good-bye.”

When Grandpa said that, though, Derek was touched again by the message that he had taught for two years in Portugal, the message that thousands each year embrace as they come into the Church—that in the restored gospel of Jesus Christ there are no good-byes, not if all the ordinances and covenants are fulfilled. Derek and his grandfather were part of an eternal family now, a family in which good-byes would never be uttered, no matter the duration of the wait between reunions.

Reaching down, Derek cradled his grandfather’s frail hands in his own. “It’s not good-bye, Grandpa, and it never will be,” he whispered fervently. “Good-byes are forever, and I’ll be seeing you again. So long, Grandpa.” As Grandpa Reilly closed his eyes, Derek looked around the room and saw his parents, brothers, and sisters gathered close around him—just a small vision, he thought, of the family circle that would go on forever.

*Discuss these questions as a family*
What religion was Grandpa Reilly?
How did Derek and Grandpa Reilly become so close?
Why was Derek not going to go on a mission?
What did Derek say in his farewell talk?
What happened to Grandpa Reilly? Did he join the church?
Was it Good-bye?

~Testify that we can see & live with family members after death~

 

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Meringue Nests or Ducky Desserts

Meringue Nests

Ingredients:

4 egg whites
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
Shredded coconut
Candy eggs (jelly beans, chocolate, egg-shaped malt balls)

Instructions:

1-Preheat the oven to 250 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper (available at most grocery stores). (about 1 to 2 minutes).

2- In a mixing bowl, whip together the egg whites, cream of tartar and salt until soft peaks form.

3- Then, slowly add the sugar, beating constantly until the mixture is glossy and stiff (another minute or so). Beat in the vanilla extract until just combined.

4- Now you’re ready to make the meringue nests. Spoon three mounds of the mixture onto each baking sheet. Use the bowl of the spoon to shape each mound into a 4-inch-wide circle with a 2-inch-deep depression in the center. Give your nests a lived-in look by sprinkling shredded coconut over each one.

5- Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the meringues are dry and the coconut has turned golden brown. Once cool, tuck one malted candy egg or jelly bean into the nest for each child in the family. Makes 6 nests.

Ducky Desserts

Ingredients:

Ice cream, flavor of your choice
Chocolate chips or raisins
Orange gumdrop, flattened
Fruit leather or dried apricots

Instructions:

1-First spread out a paper cupcake liner and set it on a small plate or in a bowl.

2- For the body, place a large scoop of vanilla ice cream or lemon sherbet on top of the liner.

3- Create a neck by topping the body with a spoonful of ice cream and use the bowl of the spoon to flatten it slightly. Place a small scoop of ice cream on the neck for the head. Press on chocolate chips or raisins for eyes.

4- For a beak, flatten an orange gumdrop and cut it into two pieces. Or you can simply insert a shelled peanut into the ice cream.

5- Finally, make webbed feet with pieces of fruit leather or dried apricots.

 

(Recipes taken from Familyfun.go.com)

 

FHE Game / Activity

Activity


1-  Go to a nearby cemetery and looks at an ancestors grave or graves. (You may want to make it more interesting by creating a scavenger hunt. For example, find someone who died as a baby or someone who served in the military, etc)

2- Go on a nature walk as a family. (Notice the birds, flowers, etc).

3- Play Go Fish

 

 

 

 

Stripped of Envy

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Posted in Commandments, Family, God's Love, Honesty, Individual Worth | Posted on 07-02-2014

Tags: , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture


Alma 5:29

“29 Behold, I say, is there one among you who is not stripped of envy? I say unto you that such an one is not prepared; and I would that he should prepare  quickly, for the hour is close at hand, and he knoweth not when the time shall come; for such an one is not found guiltless.”

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn


Love at Home- Hymns #294

1. There is beauty all around
When there’s love at home;
There is joy in ev’ry sound
When there’s love at home.
Peace and plenty here abide,
Smiling sweet on ev’ry side.
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.

2. In the cottage there is joy
When there’s love at home;
Hate and envy ne’er annoy
When there’s love at home.
Roses bloom beneath our feet;
All the earth’s a garden sweet,
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.

3. Kindly heaven smiles above
When there’s love at home;
All the world is filled with love
When there’s love at home.
Sweeter sings the brooklet by;
Brighter beams the azure sky.
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* Read or share part of Does Heavenly Father love others more than He loves me? Discuss the importance of knowing Heavenly Father loves us all equally and why we should not be envious of others.

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles shares some of his thoughts on this subject.

Does Heavenly Father love others more than He loves me?

Someone or something is forever telling us we need to be more handsome or more wealthy, more applauded or more admired than we see ourselves as being. We are told we haven’t collected enough possessions or gone to enough fun places. … But God does not work this way.

No one of us is less treasured or cherished of God than another.

He loves each of us—insecurities, anxieties, self-image, and all.

He doesn’t measure our talents or our looks; He doesn’t measure our professions or our possessions. He cheers on every runner.

Walk peacefully. Walk confidently. Walk without fear and without envy. Be reassured of Heavenly Father’s abundance to you always.

 

*For The Whole Family*  Read through and share some from The envy I Never thought I Had Discuss the way in which we may be envious of others wihout knowing and why it is important to rid ourselves of those feelings.

It didn’t seem fair that Dad made things much easier for my sister than he did for me.

father and daughters

Illustration by Steven Keele

Envy is a strong word. When people talked about being “envious,” I knew it would never describe me. So when I listened to Elder Jeffrey R. Holland’s talk “The Laborers in the Vineyard” in the April 2012 general conference, I didn’t really think he was talking to me. I tried to think of things I would occasionally be jealous of—someone’s dress, my friend’s bag, or my sister’s good grade. Yet all of these things came and went quickly; I never thought I dwelled on jealousy.

But as I went back and read Elder Holland’s words, his paraphrasing of a line from a parable stuck out to me: “Why should you be jealous because Ichoose to be kind?” (Ensign, May 2012, 31). Now, this was a different type of jealousy—not about material things but about someone’s choices. I began to think of the many times I may have been envious of my siblings, and then it clicked: this is exactly what I have been struggling with.

My little sister Mary is about to move out and start her first year in college, so I was talking to my dad about where she would work this summer. I knew he most likely had three jobs lined up for her like he had for me, because when I graduated from high school he made it very clear that if I planned on going to college, I would need a summer job. This was stressed so much that I even started a job the day of my graduation. I worked hard all summer and earned the money to pay my way through school. So naturally, when I was talking to my dad about Mary’s summer before college, I expected to hear the same story.

To my surprise, my dad explained that Mary would just be working at her part-time job until June and then take the summer off before school. Immediately several thoughts came to mind: “What about paying for school by yourself? How is she going to afford tuition? And what about paying for that nice apartment she’s decided to move into?” This just wasn’t fair.

I don’t know why it bothered me so much, but I let it continue to affect me. That is, until I reread Elder Holland’s conference talk. I read the question: “Why should you be jealous because I choose to be kind?” This time I changed it to fit my situation and asked myself: “Why should I be jealous that my parents are being kind to my sister?” Still a little upset, I then thought, “Well, why didn’t they show that kindness to me?”

I sat there pondering my emotions and then read through Elder Holland’s words again. This time I realized what I was missing: I had been looking for everything to be fair. In my eyes, the same thing that worked for me was obviously the right choice for the rest of my siblings. But Mary isn’t me. Mary is much more of a homebody than I am, and I started realizing how the transition to college might be tougher on her than it was for me. Maybe having a few months just to spend with my family is something she needs.

I suddenly felt embarrassed about my envious thoughts. Elder Holland compared envy with “downing another quart of pickle juice every time anyone around you has a happy moment” (Ensign, May 2012, 32), and that is not how I want to be.

I am so grateful for general conference and the inspired messages that are shared. I know that if we open our hearts to the messages of the living prophets and prayerfully search through their words several times, we will find what God wants us to hear at this time in our lives.

 

FHE Treat

Treat


Green Cheesecake Bars & Banana Dippers

Green with Envy Cheesecake Bars

IngredientsGreenCheesCk

  1. 1 1/2 cups chocolate wafer cookie crumbs (about 30 cookies)
  2. 1/3 cup butter, melted
  3. 3 packages (8oz) cream cheese, softened
  4. 1 cup sugar
  5. 1/2 cup sour cream
  6. 1 teaspoon Peppermint Extract
  7. 1/2 teaspoon green food coloring
  8. 3 eggs
  9. 2oz semi-sweet baking chocolate, melted

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix cookie crumbs and butter. Press firmly onto bottom of foil-lined 9-inch square baking pan. Refrigerate until ready to use.
  2. Beat cream cheese and sugar in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended. Add sour cream and peppermint extract; mix well. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating on low speed after each addition just until blended. Pour 1/2 of the batter over crust. Tint remaining batter green with food color. Pour over batter in pan.
  3. Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until center is almost set. Cool completely on wire rack.
  4. Refrigerate 4 hours or overnight. Lift out of pan onto cutting board. Cut into bars. Drizzle bars with melted chocolate. Store leftover bars in refrigerator.

(From McCormick )


Banana Dippers

Ingredientsbanadip

  1. 2 Bananas
  2. Peanut Butter
  3. Your Favorite Granola Mix

Instructions

  1. Cut Bananas Into 1 1/2 inches chunks.
  2. Spread One end of each with about 1/2 teaspoon peanut butter
  3. Dip in your favorite granola mix

(From Food Network )

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

  1. Have your own Olympic Games, even more fun if you do it with extended family!
  2. Play a game of charades based on your favorite seasonal events or words!

Love Thy Neighbor

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Posted in Family, Gratitude, Love | Posted on 29-11-2013

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FHE Scripture

Scripture


Matthew 22:39

39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn


Love One Another – Children’s Song Book #136

As I have loved you,
Love one another.
This new commandment:
Love one another.
By this shall men know
Ye are my disciples,
If ye have love
One to another.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* (Share this story) Good Neighbors

On a recent Saturday, I invited my friend Mandy to come with me to a Primary activity. She had never been to our church before, and she had a good time. She met new friends, and we learned about traffic safety and the eleventh article of faith.

After the activity, we went bike riding in our neighborhood. When we rode around the back of the nearby apartment complex, we saw an elderly woman lying on the ground at the foot of the stairs. Her hand was cut, and she wasn’t moving! It looked like she had fallen while going up the stairs to a second-story apartment. We raced our bikes back to my house to get my mom and dad.

“Dad! Mom! A woman fell, and she’s not moving! And there’s blood!”

My parents ran to help, and Mandy and I rode our bikes. When we all got back to her, the woman—Mrs. Sumner—could speak but was a little confused. We introduced ourselves and made sure that she hadn’t broken any bones. Then my mom and my dad helped her to stand up and climb the stairs to her apartment. She said that she would call the doctor about her hand.

Mom told us later that it was a good thing that we were out riding our bikes and saw Mrs. Sumner and went for help, or she might have lain there for a long time. Mrs. Sumner is eighty-five years old. She lives alone, and sometimes has trouble getting around.

The next day my dad and I went to see how she was doing, and later Mandy and I took her some apples that we had picked.

Now Mrs. Sumner is our friend, and she has invited us to visit whenever we want. Sometimes she gives us cookies, and once she gave us each a little ceramic angel she had made. She told Mandy and me that we are her “little angels.”

In our family home evening, we talked about the Good Samaritan and how Jesus Christ wants us to help our neighbors when they are in trouble. I am glad that Mandy and I could be Good Samaritans, especially because now we have a new friend!

 

 

*For The Whole Family* Read and share from the thougts and stories stories found in Love Thy Neighbor

The Lord’s concern for the one is evident in many ways. Luke gives three illustrations: the parables of the lost sheep, the misplaced piece of silver, and the prodigal son. Each emphasizes the concern our Lord has for the individual soul.

This concern continues today. The First Presidency recently said that those not receiving the blessings of full activity in the Church are invited to “come back and feast at the table of the Lord, and taste again the sweet and satisfying fruits of fellowship with the Saints.” (Ensign, Mar. 1986, p. 88.)

Sometimes in our zeal to do right, we may stumble over our own feet. Our efforts to do good may be undermined unknowingly by labels we apply, even though labels can be important. Our Sunday School studies of the Old Testament have shown us the symbolic significance of names given to the great patriarchs. Abram, for example, had a name that means “exalted father.” Then, just as he was getting used to that name after nearly one hundred years, the Lord changed it from Abram toAbraham to indicate that he would be more than an exalted father. He would become “a father of many nations.” (See Gen. 17:1–5.)

Gabriel, magnified by many heavenly errands, bears a name that means “man of God.”

Elijah, meaning “my God is Jehovah,” has components of the names of both Elohim and Jehovah. Bearing a name signifying the Father and the Son, Elijah was the one entrusted with the keys “to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the children to the fathers.” (D&C 110:15.)

But a human soul without such purposeful designation searches for identity and assurance. In a popular musical an orphan sings these lines:

Every night I kneel and pray,
Let tomorrow be the day
When I can see the face of someone who
I can mean something to.
Where, where is love?

(Lionel Bart, Oliver.)

If a child, slow of speech, is declared a stammerer by others, he or she may speak with even less assurance than before. In fact, some evidence suggests that stuttering is aggravated merely by labeling one a stutterer. Unkind words exchanged between people can also injure deeply, especially if discourteous labels are applied in the process.

People tend to become what is expected of them. Labels convey those expectations. Pigeons may feel comfortable in designated pigeonholes, but people can be offended when labeled or classified.

Yet, in spite of the obvious dangers, we are prone to label one another. “Smoker,” “drinker,” “inactive,” “liberal,” “unorthodox” are but a few terms applied, as though we cannot separate the doer from the deed.

In the eyes of God, all are his children; all are brothers and sisters. Millions who have joined the Church have witnessed to the Lord at the time of their baptism their willingness to take upon themselves his name and to keep his commandments. Having entered the first gate of baptism to embark upon the strait and narrow path (see 2 Ne. 31:17–18), members of the Church may progress toward salvation and exaltation.

But we progress at our own pace. Each of us, regardless of struggles, is a choice soul, precious in the sight of the Lord. Many of us, if not most, will slip and fall somewhere along the way.

Because leaders stand at a higher level of perception, they can look on those making the climb to identify those in distress. I hope those who are leaders—stake presidents, bishops, home teachers, visiting teachers—have learned to love and to lift all members, but especially to lift those who have stumbled along the gospel pathway.

“For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up. (Eccl. 4:10.)

I believe this is what the Lord meant when he taught us through Paul to “lift up the hands which hang down, and the feeble knees; and make straight paths for your feet.” (Heb. 12:12–13.) For that correct path leads to the glorious gate that enables blessings of the priesthood to come into our lives. That is the gate of the temple. The ultimate reason for our membership in the Church is that we may enjoy all the blessings there for us and our families.

Obstacles along the way, such as habituation to tobacco or to stimulating drinks like coffee and tea, need not raise artificial barriers between us as brothers and sisters or between an individual and the fulfillment of his or her own potential.

Years ago I was given a home teaching assignment to a special couple. A faithful, wonderful wife welcomed us to their home while her husband retreated to a small room filled with amateur radio equipment. But our concern for him was great enough that we tolerated the dense smoke of his cigars as he reluctantly responded to our questions about the principles of radio operation.

As our regular visits continued, earlier barriers melted into bonds of dear friendship. Our wives became fast friends, too. The sweetness of his soul began to emerge. He refined his life. Now, more than thirty years later, we look back on his distinguished service as a stake president, mission president, and temple president. Last year, I had the great privilege of ordaining this dear friend of mine a patriarch!

Paul wrote to the Galatians: “Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness. …

“Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ. …

“As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.” (Gal. 6:1–2, 10.)

A wife grieves because of errant activities of her husband. Parents sorrow when a child goes astray. But scriptures hold great promise, particularly for those who have been taught the gospel earlier in life: “Train up a child in the way he should go,” the proverb states, “and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” (Prov. 22:6.)

Job expressed hope with this analogy:

“For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease.

“Though the root thereof wax old in the earth, and the stock thereof die in the ground;

“Yet through the scent of water it will bud, and bring forth boughs like a plant.” (Job 14:7–9.)

That scent of water is the wonderful refreshment of love. Most of the disaffected have separated themselves from full fellowship in the Church not because of doctrinal disputations but because of hurt, neglect, or lack of love. Progress toward full participation in the blessings of the gospel needs no new programs, only a new vision of love that can be rendered best by friends and neighbors.

When someone asked the Savior, “Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.

“This is the first and great commandment.

“And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

“On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.” (Matt. 22:36–40.)

Quick and easy ways to “come back” cannot be packaged at Church headquarters and delivered to local priesthood leaders. Love cannot be conveyed remotely, even with new technology. These two great commandments must be applied by leaders of the Church locally, thus building the Church throughout the world:

“Preach my gospel … and cause my church to be established.” (D&C 28:8.)

When that happens, great blessings of eternal worth will result:

“For whoso is faithful unto the obtaining these two priesthoods of which I have spoken, and the magnifying their calling, are sanctified by the Spirit unto the renewing of their bodies.

“They become the sons of Moses and of Aaron and the seed of Abraham, and the church and kingdom, and the elect of God.”

But that is not all the scripture promises:

“They who receive this priesthood receive me, saith the Lord;

“For he that receiveth my servants receiveth me;

“And he that receiveth me receiveth my Father;

“And he that receiveth my Father receiveth my Father’s kingdom; therefore all that my Father hath shall be given unto him.” (D&C 84:33–38.)

Such blessings of supernal significance are worth all our efforts, for ourselves and for our neighbors. Priesthood quorums are an indispensable part of this preparation. Their agendas should be focused more on our Father’s business of brotherhood and blessings than on disputations. Strength from priesthood brethren bonded in mutual commitment is envisioned in this passage from the Book of Mormon:

“They were all young men, and they were exceedingly valiant for courage, and also for strength and activity; but behold, this was not all—they were men who were true at all times in whatsoever thing they were entrusted.

“Yea, they were men of truth and soberness, for they had been taught to keep the commandments of God and to walk uprightly before him.” (Alma 53:20–21.)

Let us not forget the Relief Society and its worth. Our concern applies equally to the sisters. The parable of the lost coin demonstrates the effectiveness one woman can have when seeking diligently for what was lost, and the joy she and the angels experience when one is found:

“What woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it?

“And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost.

“Likewise, … there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.” (Luke 15:8–10.)

How sorrowful must a brother or sister feel when they think they are abandoned, when they think no one cares! Perhaps it was this feeling that caused the psalmist to write, “I looked on my right hand, and beheld, but there was no man that would know me: refuge failed me; no man cared for my soul.” (Ps. 142:4.)

The church of our loving Lord cannot function that way! We all need each other. Paul explained this by likening members of the Church to parts of the body:

“If the foot shall say, Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body?

“And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body? …

“The eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.

“Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular.” (1 Cor. 12:15–16, 21, 27.)

As we fortify ourselves for our mighty redeeming tasks, may we heed this inspired prayer from the Book of Mormon:

“O Lord, wilt thou grant unto us that we may have success in bringing [our brothers and sisters] again unto thee in Christ.

“Behold, O Lord, their souls are precious, and many of them are our brethren; therefore, give unto us, O Lord, power and wisdom that we may bring these, our brethren, again unto thee.” (Alma 31:34–35.)

Let us unlabel our brothers and sisters. They are not strangers, “but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God.” (Eph. 2:19.) Let leaders and members alike love God and love one another. Obedience to these two great commandments will crown our efforts with success.

“Verily, thus saith the Lord, … if those who call themselves by my name and are essaying to be my saints, if they will do my will and keep my commandments … they may be prepared for that which is in store for a time to come.” (D&C 125:2.)

That time will be glorious, especially when shared with all the sheep of the fold, with none lost! We shall bless the lives of our families, friends, and neighbors as we help them prepare for the great day of the Lord, which is nigh.

 

FHE Treat

Treat


Frozen Hot Chocolate & Holiday Shrimp Dip

Frozen Hot Chocolate

IngredientsFrozenHotChoc

  1. 1 cup hot cocoa powder
  2. 3 Tablespoons sugar
  3. 3 cups milk
  4. 6 cups ice
  5. Optional: Whipped topping, Chocolate syrup, Chocolate shavings

Instructions:

Guacamole/Goat Cheese Layer

  1. Add all ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.  Pour into glasses and top with whipped topping, a drizzle of chocolate syrup and chocolate shavings.

(From Six Sisters Stuff )


Holiday Shrimp Dip

IngredientsShrimDip

Guacamole/Goat Cheese Layer

  1. 1 (8 ounce) fat free cream cheese, softened
  2. 2 cups of frozen shrimp, thawed
  3. 1 (8 ounce) jar cocktail sauce
  4. 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  5. 1/2 red bell pepper, diced
  6. 5 Green Onions, chopped
  7. assorted crackers for dipping

Instructions

  1. Spread cream cheese in an even layer on a serving dish or in the bottom of a glass pie pan.
  2. Combine shrimp with cocktail sauce in a bowl and spread evenly over the cream cheese layer.
  3. Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese, covering the shrimp layer. Sprinkle the red pepper and green onions over the cheese layer.
  4. Serve with your favorite crackers. My favorites are Wheat Thins and Triscuits.
  5. Happy Dipping!!!

(From Six Sisters Stuff )

FHE Game / Activity

Activity


1- As a family, plan how you can serve each of your neighbors in the coming weeks.

2- Play games in which you work together for a common goal.

 

Justice & Mercy

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Posted in God's Love, Gratitude, Jesus Christ | Posted on 05-09-2013

Tags: , , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture

Alma 34:16

“16 And thus mercy can satisfy the demands of justice, and encircles them in the arms of safety, while he that exercises no faith unto repentance is exposed to the whole law of the demands of justice.”

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

 

‘Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Love - Hymn #176

1. ‘Tis sweet to sing the matchless love
Of Him who left his home above
And came to earth–oh, wondrous plan–
To suffer, bleed, and die for man!

2. ‘Tis good to meet each Sabbath day
And, in his own appointed way,
Partake the emblems of his death,
And thus renew our love and faith.

3. Oh, blessed hour! communion sweet!
When children, friends, and teachers meet
And, in remembrance of his grace,
Unite in sweetest songs of praise.

4. For Jesus died on Calvary!
That all thru him might ransomed be.
Then sing hosannas to his name;
Let heav’n and earth his love proclaim.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Children* 

Read and summarize this”Following Jesus”  from the FriendDiscuss the way in which you have seen mercy in your lives. Testify of the importance of the atonement of Jesus Christ and how only through His mercy we can satisfy justice and live with our Heavenly Father.

Jesus said, “Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy” (Matthew 5:7).

atonement

To be merciful is to treat someone with patience and love, instead of being judgmental or harsh. Through His example, Jesus Christ taught us how to be merciful. Some men once brought a woman to Jesus and said they wanted to punish her for something bad she had done. Even though the woman had sinned and needed to repent, Jesus did not let the men hurt her. Instead, He showed the woman mercy by saying, “Go, and sin no more” (John 8:11).

This week’s challenges:

Challenge 1: Smile at someone in school or in Primary who needs a friend.

Challenge 2: Offer to do something fun with a friend or sibling and let them choose the activity.

Challenge 3: At school or in Primary, sit by someone who is sitting alone. Talk, be friendly, and get to know him or her better.

Discuss the way in which you have seen mercy in your lives. Testify of the importance of the atonement of Jesus Christ and how only through His mercy we can satisfy justice and live with our Heavenly Father.

 

*For Teenagers And Adults* 

Read and summarize ”Only 10 Dollars“ by Emma C. Miller. Discuss the way in which you have seen mercy in your lives. Testify of the importance of the atonement of Jesus Christ and how only through His mercy we can satisfy justice and live with our Heavenly Father.

I wasn’t expecting the lesson in justice and mercy I learned while standing in line at the grocery store.

One semester a few years ago, after my college tuition was paid for with grant money, some cash was unexpectedly given to me. As a single mom, I was grateful indeed for this blessing.10Bill

On my way home from school, I made a quick trip to the store, grabbing a few items and making my way to the express lane. The cashier finished ringing up a man’s order, and when the man handed her the money, she protested, stating it wasn’t enough. English was not the man’s native language, however, so he had difficulty understanding.

The woman in front of me let out three heavy sighs, then turned to the rest of us in line and rolled her eyes, as if to say, “Can you believe this?” Another lady in line added a few heavy sighs of her own, along with a rhythmic tapping of her high-heeled shoes.

The cashier spoke louder, reiterating that the man needed more money. He dug into his pockets and turned them out empty. She then said loudly, “You don’t have enough money!”

Tap. Tap. Tap. The woman behind me clicked her shoes a little louder. The woman in front of me stood with her hands on her hips, shaking her head.

He was short 10 dollars. I had 10 dollars in my wallet. It was some of my “extra” money.

Just because I’ve never stood in a line at the grocery store as people glared at me for not having enough cash doesn’t mean I haven’t ever stressed over feeding my family. I can recall countless times I have worried, and it was during those times that I would receive an envelope of money in my mailbox or find a 20-dollar bill in my old jacket, or someone else would bring me dinner or let me “borrow” a can of soup. How could I ever repay their generosity?

This man needed help right then. He didn’t have time to go home and see if there was a 10-dollar bill in an old coat.

“I’ve got it,” I said. I was shaking as I reached in my purse and fumbled to release the clasp of my wallet. The woman behind me looked at me with shock, the woman in front of me with disgust, and the cashier with disbelief. “I’ve got it,” I said again, handing the bill to the cashier.

All of a sudden, 10 dollars didn’t seem like so much—especially considering everything I had been given through the kind acts of others.

I asked myself, “Isn’t this the opportunity I want anyway?” When I pray, I often ask Heavenly Father that I might be aware of those in need. Maybe this was my chance to help one in need. Some might call me foolish, saying that it wasn’t my responsibility to help this man, that he should have planned a little better. They might say that I should have used the money for my own family.

A few minutes later, as I got ready to pay for my own items, the cashier thanked me. She went on to say, “This is not the first time this has happened. He has come through my line before, and he has come up short before. It’s so frustrating. Usually I have to tell him to put something back.”

Once in my car, I began sobbing. Not because I regretted giving up the 10 dollars. Not because I felt like a do-gooder, though I did feel good about helping. But I was moved because this thought hit me: “How many times in my life have I come up short? How many times have I taken my case to the Lord in spite of feeling inadequate or unworthy to receive His blessings?”

And Heavenly Father doesn’t say, “Again? This isn’t the first time this has happened; you’ve come down this road before. This is so frustrating.” The Father doesn’t call the Savior in and ask Him to explain to us why we can’t have what we so desperately need at that moment. He doesn’t tell us we should have planned a little better. The Savior paid the price for us, and we are saved by His grace, “after all we can do” (2 Nephi 25:23).

The man at the grocery store probably gave all he had and needed someone to come to his aid. He needed mercy. Justice meant the items would have to be paid for, but mercy meant that someone else could step in and pay the debt.

I cried because this experience solidified for me how much my Heavenly Father truly loves me and that because He loves me, He sent His Son to pay for my sins. And not only did He do that, but He continues to bless me through everyday “angels” who step in from time to time to give me what I need. And sometimes He lets me know He loves me by letting meserve someone else.

Discuss the way in which you have seen mercy in your lives. Testify of the importance of the atonement of Jesus Christ and how only through His mercy we can satisfy justice and live with our Heavenly Father.

FHE Treat

Treat

Raspberry Ice or Peach and Raspberry Parfait

Raspberry Ice

IngredientsraspberryIce

  1. 1 Cup water
  2. 1/2 sugar
  3. 3 cups raspberries
  4. 1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions:

  1. In a small saucepan, combine 1 cup water and ½ cup sugar. Bring to a boil, stirring; let cool.
  2. In a blender, puree 3 cups raspberries (12 ounces) with the sugar syrup. Strain into a loaf pan or shallow dish and freeze until firm, at least 4 hours.
  3. Whip ½ cup heavy cream until soft peaks form. Using a fork, scrape the surface of the raspberry ice to create icy flakes; divide among bowls. Serve with the whipped cream and additional raspberries, if desired.

(From RealSimple)

 

 

Peach and Raspberry Parfait

IngredientsPeachRaspParf

  1. 2 peaches, cut into 2 1/2-inch pieces
  2. 1 1/2 cups raspberries
  3. 2 tablespoons sugar
  4. 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  5. 1 pint vanilla ice cream

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the peaches, raspberries, sugar, and lemon juice and let sit, tossing once, for 20 minutes.
  2. Scoop the ice cream into bowls or glasses and top with the fruit mixture.

(From RealSimple)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

  1. Play freeze tag! You can learn that justice forces you to freeze when tag, but the mercy of others can free you!
  2. Watch a movie like “The Testaments” or “Finding Faith In Christ”

Friendship And The Gospel

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Posted in God's Love, Gratitude, Individual Worth | Posted on 07-06-2013

Tags: , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture

John 15:13

“Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

Now Let Us Rejoice- Hymn #3 or Friends Are Fun -Children’s Songbook #262

Now Let Us Rejoice

1. Now let us rejoice in the day of salvation.
No longer as strangers on earth need we roam.
Good tidings are sounding to us and each nation,
And shortly the hour of redemption will come,
When all that was promised the Saints will be given,
And none will molest them from morn until ev’n,
And earth will appear as the Garden of Eden,
And Jesus will say to all Israel, “Come home.”

2. We’ll love one another and never dissemble
But cease to do evil and ever be one.
And when the ungodly are fearing and tremble,
We’ll watch for the day when the Savior will come,
When all that was promised the Saints will be given,
And none will molest them from morn until ev’n,
And earth will appear as the Garden of Eden,
And Jesus will say to all Israel, “Come home.”

3. In faith we’ll rely on the arm of Jehovah
To guide thru these last days of trouble and gloom,
And after the scourges and harvest are over,
We’ll rise with the just when the Savior doth come.
Then all that was promised the Saints will be given,
And they will be crown’d with the angels of heav’n,
And earth will appear as the Garden of Eden,
And Christ and his people will ever be one.

Friends Are Fun

1. It is fun to have a friend who will play with you.
It is fun to have a friend who can stay with you.
It is fun to make a friend for your whole life through.
But to have a friend, you must be a friend, too.

2. If you want to play a game, you should play it fair.
If you have a piece of cake, you must learn to share.
Then if you should need a friend, you would have one there.
If you want a friend, you must show that you care.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* 

Read and summarize “The Language of Friendship”  (taken from the Friend) to teach of the importance of friendship. Testify of the importance of friendships in our life and the church, discuss how friendships help mold us through our lives.

Finding a Friend

Just before he started third grade, Jeff W. moved from South Korea to Columbia, Missouri, with his parents and his younger sister, Sarah. He didn’t speak English very well, so it was hard to make friends at first.

But that was before he met Will H., a boy in his class. Will noticed Jeff reading a book about a cartoon character that Will really liked too. Will asked if he could look at Jeff’s book, and that’s where their friendship began.

When Will invited Jeff over to play, Jeff’s dad brought a whole box of goodies from a bakery. He said it was the first time anyone had invited Jeff over to play in the United States.

Finding the Gospel

Jeff and Will weren’t in the same class in fourth grade, but they still got together to play. Then Will started inviting Jeff to Primary activities. When the ward Christmas party rolled around, Will asked his mom if he could invite Jeff. Will’s mom said, “Let’s invite the whole family!”

When Jeff’s family came to the party, they felt a special feeling. Next they came to the Christmas program in sacrament meeting. They made friends in the ward and started learning more about the Church. At the end of fourth grade, Jeff and his whole family were baptized into the Church.

Becoming a member of the Church changed Jeff’s life a lot. He says it made him feel safer. At first he liked going to church because he could see Will. Soon he liked answering questions about the scriptures.

Speaking the Language

Jeff learned to speak English so well that he represented his class in the school geography bee. Will learned that language doesn’t have to be a barrier to friendship. And Jeff’s family learned that the Spirit speaks to all of Heavenly Father’s children in the same language.

Moving Back to South Korea

Two months after Jeff was baptized, he moved with his family back to South Korea. School there is very competitive. Many students go to another school after their regular school day to learn extra math and English. But Jeff already speaks English so well that he takes piano lessons instead.

There aren’t very many members of the Church in Bucheon, South Korea, where Jeff and his family live. But everyone in the ward is good and kind, says Jeff’s dad. Every Sunday Jeff likes seeing the other six Primary children who are his age. He also likes it when the missionaries come over for dinner.

Even though Jeff and Will don’t get to see each other right now, they have big plans for the future. When they get older, they want to go to Brigham Young University together!

Testify of the importance of friendships in our life and the church, discuss how friendships help mold us through our lives.

 

*For All Family Members* 
Read or summarize “Small Miracles of Friendship“ (taken from the New Era). Testify of the importance of friendships in our life and the church, discuss how friendships help mold us through our lives.

I can sincerely say that Jennifer and I had a blast together. We used to run down the church halls, laughing as hard as we could, our main goal to see who could make the most noise. Even when we were scolded, we couldn’t stop laughing.friends

The other people in the ward probably didn’t appreciate the friendship as much as we did. But it certainly helped me. When I was 12 years old, my mother told me she had decided not to go to church anymore, but I still could if I wanted to. I never did like getting up on Sunday mornings and listening to lessons, so I decided not to go anymore either.

When I told Jennifer of my mom’s decision, she offered to have her mom start swinging by my house to pick me up for church. I loved the fellowship and fun, and their family picked me up faithfully. I was sorely disappointed a few years later when they moved away.

By this time, I wanted to continue going to church on my own, but that was such a challenge! It was hard for me to sit alone at church. I felt like everyone was staring at me and feeling sorry for me because my family wasn’t with me. To ward off sympathy, I would sit with my head bowed, reading a book until the meeting started. I felt sorry for myself and thought the challenge wasn’t worth it. I decided that without a family, the Church was not going to be true for me.

It was another small miracle of friendship that brought me back. Wendolyn and I had been friends since childhood, but we’d slowly drifted apart. One afternoon, Wendolyn and her mother sat me down and told me about the importance of going to church. They offered to have me go and sit with their family. My main stumbling block was removed! I had people to sit with who cared!

Through the rest of my high school years, my friendship with Wendolyn deepened, and my testimony of the gospel along with it. Wendolyn’s mother even offered to help me pay for a mission if I ever decided to go. I was touched by their willingness to sacrifice for me and for the gospel.

I know it is sometimes hard to accept an outsider into your family, but these two families accepted me, and to them I owe my active participation in the Church today. I will be eternally grateful to these friends. What small miracles of friendship can do!

Testify of the importance of friendships in our life and the church, discuss how friendships help mold us through our lives.

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Cantaloupe Popsicles or Funfetti Bark

Cantaloupe Popsicles

IngredientsCantalopePopsicles

  1. 5 cups diced cantaloupe
  2. 5-7 strwaberries, sliced

Instructions:

  1. Add a few pieces of sliced strawberries to your popsicle mold.
  2. Purée the cantaloupe.
  3. Pour the liquid cantaloupe into the popsicle mold.
  4. Add the popsicle sticks.
  5. Freeze for at least 4 hours.

(Taken from Chocolate&Carrots)

 

Ultimate Peanut Butter Pie

Ingredients

FunfettiBark

  1. 7 ounces dark chocolate
  2. 8 ounces white chocolate
  3. 3 heaping tablespoons funfetti cake mix
  4. 1 tablespoon rainbow sprinkles

Instructions:

  1. Melt the dark chocolate in a double boiler.
  2. Spread the chocolate out on a baking sheet that has been covered with parchment paper or a silpat mat.
  3. Freeze for 20 minutes.
  4. In a microwave safe bowl, microwave the white chocolate in 15 second intervals, stirring in between until melted.
  5. Slowly add in the funfetti mix into the white chocolate.
  6. Spread the white chocolate onto the dark chocolate.
  7. Sprinkle with sprinkles.
  8. Freeze again for 20 minutes.
  9. Take out of the freezer and allow to warm up for just 2 minutes.
  10. Cut or break into pieces.
  11. Store in the refrigerator.

(Taken from Chocolate&Carrots)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1- Visit a Friend you haven’t seen in a while.

2- Go on a Bug Safari - Dig for worms, scout for lizards, and hunt for frogs and tadpoles. Marvel at an ant carrying an oversize crumb.

The Spirit of Giving

2

Posted in Christmas, Holiday, Jesus Christ | Posted on 06-12-2012

Tags: , , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture

Russell M Nelson Quote

” This Christmas season, through all of our various Christmas traditions, I hope that we are focused first upon the Lord Jesus Christ.”

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

 Picture a Christmas- Primary Songbook #50-51 or Hark! The Herald Angles Sing- Hymn #209

Picture a Christmas

1. Picture a stable in Judea.
Picture a sacred, silent night.
And can you hear
The angels near
And see the star so bright?

Picture the little baby Jesus.
Think of his life and words so dear.
Sing praise to him;
Remember him,
As you picture Christmas this year.

2. Picture the kind and gentle Joseph.
Picture the mother, Mary, fair.
And can you see
So rev’rently
The shepherds kneeling there?

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

1. Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the newborn King!
Peace on earth and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled!
Joyful, all ye nations, rise;
Join the triumph of the skies;
With th’angelic host proclaim
Christ is born in Bethlehem!

[Chorus]
Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the newborn King!

2. Hail the heav’n-born Prince of Peace!
Hail the Son of Righteousness!
Light and life to all he brings,
Ris’n with healing in his wings.
Mild he lays his glory by,
Born that man no more may die;
Born to raise the sons of earth,
Born to give them second birth.

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For All Family Members* Read or summarize the following article “A Christmas Eve Transformation” (taken from December 2012 Ensign).  Watch the video: What Shall We Give? below. Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

On Christmas Eve, I waited at the bus station in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, to pick up my parents after their five-hour bus ride from Vernal, Utah, to spend Christmas with my sister’s family and me. The bus arrived very late—two hours in fact.

While I waited, I thought about how difficult this holiday season had been for me. I had tried to focus on my preparations for Christmas, but this year my children were traveling with their own families and my husband had passed away, and I soon discovered that no amount of shopping and wrapping or beautiful Christmas music could lighten my heavy heart. However, I pushed these thoughts from my mind when I saw my parents get off the bus.

Soon my mother and I were chatting, waiting in line to pick up their baggage. She casually mentioned that a grandmother on the bus had traveled all the way from Chicago, Illinois, USA, to connect with another bus that would take her to her final destination in Pocatello, Idaho, USA. This traveler was sad and upset, however, because she had missed her connection. Even if she boarded the next bus to Pocatello, she would still miss Christmas with her daughter and new granddaughter.

I pictured in my mind a disappointed grandma alone in a hotel room in a strange city on Christmas Eve. I felt a terrible sadness for her and wanted to do something to help her.

I soon found her talking on a pay phone to her daughter. I walked up to her, gently tapped her on the arm, and asked if I could speak with her. She looked startled but put her hand over the receiver and said, “Yes?”

“Are you the lady who missed the connection to Pocatello?” I asked.

She responded, “Yes.”

The next words out of my mouth surprised both my mother and the stranger. “Will you ask your daughter if she is familiar with Tremonton, Utah?”

With hesitation in her voice, she asked her daughter the question. “Yes, she knows where that is,” came the reply.

“Ask her if she could drive there tonight. That is about halfway from Salt Lake City to Pocatello.”

She again relayed my question to her daughter, and again the answer was affirmative.

“You two decide on a time to meet,” I said, “and I will have you there—but give her this phone number in the event that something goes wrong and we need to communicate.”

I couldn’t hear any more of the conversation, but after she hung up, she looked at me in utter amazement. My mother, too, was in shock as she said to my stepfather, “Harold, make room in the back of Myrle’s car for this lady’s luggage. She is going home with us.”

I introduced myself and my parents to the stranger and learned that her name was Vanessa Black. My stepfather loaded Vanessa’s bags into my little car, Vanessa climbed into the only spot left, and then we all headed to my sister’s house for dinner before leaving for our destination. My heart was joyful as I kept reassuring her that she was no inconvenience (just 80 or so miles [130 km] out of the way).

Our arrival at Tremonton was greeted by an empty town. The service stations and restaurants were closed, and everything was dark as we looked for the place where we were to meet Vanessa’s daughter. Meanwhile, the daughter, who had understood that we would be arriving a half hour earlier, was anxiously trying to contact us by phone. We pulled up to a phone booth, and as my car lights shined into the booth, there stood Vanessa’s daughter. When she saw the lights of my car, she came running, and Vanessa jumped out of the car to embrace her sobbing daughter.

After a short introduction, I said, “Well, we both have a drive ahead of us, so we will leave you now. I hope you have a wonderful Christmas.”

Her daughter threw her arms around me and in a teary voice responded, “We will, thanks to you! Merry Christmas to you too.”

When I look back on that Christmas, my heart warms at the memory of the most joyous, peaceful Christmas I ever had. My gift to Vanessa Black was a perfect way for me to remember the birth of the Savior, who said, “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:40). That Christmas, I received the best possible gift to brighten my Christmas—the gift of giving.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

 

*For Younger Children* Read or tell the following story: “My Gift to Jesus”   (taken from the December 2012 Friend)Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

“Time for family home evening!” Dad called.

I hurried to the living room. We always did fun things on the first family home evening of December.

My younger sister, Michelle, ran ahead of me and jumped into the soft blue armchair.

“No fair!” I exclaimed. “You got to sit there last week. It’s my turn.”

“I got here first, so I get to sit here,” she argued. “You can sit on the couch.”

“I don’t want to sit on the couch,” I snapped.

I stormed over to the rocking chair and turned it so I wouldn’t have to look at Michelle. She made me so mad sometimes! She thought she could have whatever she wanted. Whenever I complained, Mom told me I needed to be unselfish.

After our family sang a hymn and prayed, Dad said, “Christmas is an exciting time, and we need to remember the true meaning of the holiday. Tonight we are going to start with our gifts to Jesus.”

Our gifts to Jesus. I had forgotten about that! We did it every year.

“We celebrate Christmas because Jesus was born,” Dad continued. “He made it possible for us to receive the greatest gift—eternal life with Heavenly Father.”

“And what has He asked us to do in return?” Mom asked.

“To follow Him and keep His commandments,” my brother answered.

Mom gave us each a card and pen. We were supposed to write how we would show Jesus we love Him. That was our gift—to choose something we would do to be more like Jesus.

I knew immediately what my gift should be. Jesus taught us to love others, even if they made us angry. I knew Jesus wanted me to love my sister. I wrote, “I will be nice to Michelle.”

We put our cards in a box wrapped in gold paper. We put the box under the Christmas tree. Every time we looked at the box, we were supposed to remember the Savior’s gift to us and our gift to Him.

A few days later, I saw that Michelle had taken my favorite shirt without asking. I wanted to yell at her. Then I looked at the gold box and remembered how much I loved Jesus. I could show Him love by being kind to my sister. I said, “You look really pretty today, Michelle.”

She smiled. “I’m sorry I didn’t ask to wear your shirt. You weren’t here when I got dressed, and I wanted to look extra nice for my class Christmas party today.”

I felt warm inside. I was glad I had chosen to be nice to Michelle instead of getting angry at her.

For the rest of the month, I tried to remember that good feeling and my goal to be like Jesus. I got better at being patient and loving.

On Christmas Eve, Dad read the nativity story, and the rest of us acted it out. I decided to be the angel instead of arguing with Michelle over who got to play the part of Mary.

Next we opened the gold box and read our gifts to Jesus out loud. When I read mine, Mom said, “I’ve noticed that you’ve been extra nice to Michelle. I’m so proud of you!”

I was proud too. I hadn’t unwrapped any presents yet, but I had already received something special: a feeling from the Holy Ghost telling me I had done the right thing.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

 

*For Teenagers or Adults*  Read & share points from the following article “Gifts You Can’t Wrap” by President Monson (taken from December 2012 New Era).  Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

At Christmastime we often focus on giving gifts to those we love. But remember that some of the greatest presents are those you can’t wrap. Here are some unforgettable gifts you can give your parents.

Service

One of the greatest gifts you can give is service.

  • Clean the house.
  • Offer to babysit.
  • Set and clear the table.
  • Make dinner for your family.
  • Do the dishes or sweep the floor.
  • Help a sibling with his or her homework.
  • Depending on the climate where you live, shovel the walkway or weed the garden.

Family Time

Even though you have a busy schedule, make time for your family. Your presence will help support your parents, and they will thank you for your efforts.

  • Participate in family home evening (without having to be reminded about it).
  • Play with your siblings.
  • Be on time for family dinners.
  • Talk with and listen to family members.
  • Participate in family prayer and scripture reading.
  • Spend time with your family instead of just your friends, or invite your friends to family activities (with your parents’ permission).

Commitment

Let your parents know you are committing to something important. The best way to show your commitment is to start now and keep going.

  • Prepare to serve a mission (for young men). Start now by building up a mission fund if possible.
  • Study the scriptures daily.
  • Save some of your earnings.
  • Go to school without complaint and do your homework on time.
  • Attend seminary. If you go to seminary in the morning, wake up on your own.
  • Prepare for temple marriage. Make a list of important qualities to look for in a future spouse and then develop those qualities in yourself.

Attitude

Your parents will appreciate a good attitude toward them and your other family members.

  • Have a positive attitude.
  • Don’t point out flaws in your parents or siblings.
  • Make a habit of saying thank you, even for the small things.
  • Write a thank-you letter to your parents for all they’ve done for you.
  • Resolve conflicts with your parents or siblings without anger or argument.
  • Count your blessings—literally. Create a list of things you’ve been able to do because of your parents’ support, and share the list with them.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas - giving, not receiving.

FHE Treat

Treat

Grasshopper Chocolate Bark or Candy Cane Crinkles

Grasshopper Chocolate Bark

Yields 24 Pieces

Ingredient

1 1/2 lbs (24 oz) semisweet chocolate, chopped (or chunks)
1 1/2 lbs (24 oz) white chocolate, chopped (or white baking chips)
2 Tbsp vegetable or canola oil or shortening, divided
1 tsp mint extract (optional)
Green food coloring
5 oz package of Andes mints, unwrapped and roughly chopped

Instructions:

1. Line the bottom of a baking sheet with wax paper.

2. Melt white chocolate or white baking chips in the microwave or a bowl set over simmering water (see tips above).

3. Add food coloring, mint extract, and then 1 Tbsp vegetable oil, stirring just until smooth and uniformly green.

4. Pour the green chocolate into the baking sheet and spread it evenly almost to the edge of wax paper.

5. Lift the pan a few inches above the countertop and let it fall back onto the counter. Repeat a few times to bring any air bubbles to the surface.

6. Let cool for ~10 minutes in the fridge.

7. Melt remaining chocolate in the microwave.

8. Stir in the vegetable oil.

9. Pour over the green mint layer and spread it evenly, almost to the edge of the green layer.

10. Drop the pan onto the countertop to get rid of any air bubbles.

11. Sprinkle the chopped mints over top and refrigerate until set, about 20 minutes.

12. Cut or break into pieces.

13. Store in an airtight container in a cool place. I loosely wrapped several pieces in wax paper before gifting. (Taken from Confections of a Foodie Bride)

Candy Cane Crinkles

Ingredients:

3 whole candy canes, crushed
½ cups Butter, Softened
1 cup Granulated Sugar
½ teaspoons Vanilla Extract
1 whole Egg
¼ teaspoons Salt
¼ teaspoons Baking Powder
⅛ teaspoons Baking Soda
1-½ cup All-purpose Flour
½ cups Powdered Sugar
Instructions:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease light colored baking sheets with non stick cooking spray, line with parchment paper or use silicone baking mat and set aside.2. Place candy canes into a plastic food storage bag and crush using a rolling pin. Set aside.3. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Whip in vanilla and egg. Scrape sides and mix again. Stir all dry ingredients together in a small bowl and then in pour into mixer and slowly mix until just combined, excluding the powdered sugar. Scrape sides of bowl and mix again briefly. Stir in crushed candy canes. Pour powdered sugar onto a large plate. Roll a heaping teaspoon of dough into a ball and roll in powdered sugar. Place on baking sheet and repeat with remaining dough.4. Bake for 9-11 minutes or until bottoms begin to barely brown and cookies look matte {not melty or shiny}. Remove from oven and cool cookies about 3 minutes before transferring to cooling rack.

*If using a non stick darker baking tray, reduce baking time by about 2 minutes. (Taken from Lauren’s Latest)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1- Do a secret act of service for a neighbor or friend.

2- Go Christmas caroling.

3- Print, Cutout & make the Nativity.

Christmas Spirit

0

Posted in Christmas, Holiday, Jesus Christ | Posted on 28-11-2012

Tags: , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture

Luke 2:11

11. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

 Christmas Bells – Primary Songbook #54 or I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day- Hymn #214

Christmas Bells

1. Christmas bells are ringing.
Hear what they say to you:
Jesus is born in Bethlehem, in Bethlehem.

2. Christmas bells, ringing, singing:
Jesus is born, is born
in Bethlehem, born in Bethlehem.

I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

1. I heard the bells on Christmas day
Their old familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet the words repeat
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

2. I thought how, as the day had come,
The belfries of all Christendom
Had rolled along th’unbroken song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

3. And in despair I bowed my head:
“There is no peace on earth,” I said,
“For hate is strong and mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.”

4. Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth he sleep;
The wrong shall fail, the right prevail,
With peace on earth, good will to men.”

5. Till, ringing, singing, on its way,
The world revolved from night to day,
A voice, a chime, a chant sublime,
Of peace on earth, good will to men!

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For All Family Members* Read or summarize the following article “Rediscovering the Christmas Spirit” by President Monson (taken from December 2012 Ensign).  Watch the video: Christmas Spirit below. Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

Years ago as a young elder, I was called with others to a hospital in Salt Lake City to provide blessings for sick children. Upon entering, we noted a Christmas tree with its bright and friendly lights and saw carefully wrapped packages beneath its outstretched limbs. We then went through corridors where small boys and girls—some with plaster casts upon an arm or leg, others with ailments that perhaps could not be cured so readily—greeted us with smiling faces.

A young, desperately ill small boy called out to me, “What is your name?”

I told him my name, and he inquired, “Will you give me a blessing?”

The blessing was provided, and as we turned to leave his bedside, he said, “Thank you very much.”

We walked a few steps, and then I heard him call, “Oh, Brother Monson, merry Christmas to you.” Then a great smile flashed across his countenance.

That boy had the spirit of Christmas. The spirit of Christmas is something I hope all of us would have in our hearts and lives—not only at this particular season but also throughout the year.

When we have the spirit of Christmas, we remember Him whose birth we commemorate at this season of the year: “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:11).

In our day the spirit of giving gifts plays a large role in commemorating the Christmas season. I wonder if we might profit by asking ourselves, What gifts would the Lord have me give to Him or to others at this precious season of the year?

May I suggest that our Heavenly Father would want each of us to render to Him and to His Son the gift of obedience. I also feel that He would ask us to give of ourselves and not be selfish or greedy or quarrelsome, as His precious Son suggests in the Book of Mormon:

“Verily, verily I say unto you, he that hath the spirit of contention is not of me, but is of the devil, who … stirreth up the hearts of men to contend with anger, one with another.

“Behold, this is not my doctrine, to stir up the hearts of men with anger, one against another; but this is my doctrine, that such things should be done away” (3 Nephi 11:29–30).

In this marvelous dispensation of the fulness of times, our opportunities to love and give of ourselves are indeed limitless, but they are also perishable. Today there are hearts to gladden, kind words to say, deeds to be done, and souls to be saved.

One who had keen insight into the Christmas spirit wrote:

I am the Christmas Spirit—
I enter the home of poverty, causing palefaced children to open their eyes wide, in pleased wonder.
I cause the miser’s clutched hand to relax and thus paint a bright spot on his soul.
I cause the aged to renew their youth and to laugh in the old glad way.
I keep romance alive in the heart of childhood, and brighten sleep with dreams woven of magic.
I cause eager feet to climb dark stairways with filled baskets, leaving behind hearts amazed at the goodness of the world.
I cause the prodigal to pause a moment on his wild, wasteful way and send to anxious love some little token that releases glad tears—tears which wash away the hard lines of sorrow.
I enter dark prison cells, reminding scarred manhood of what might have been and pointing forward to good days yet to be.
I come softly into the still, white home of pain, and lips that are too weak to speak just tremble in silent, eloquent gratitude.
In a thousand ways, I cause the weary world to look up into the face of God, and for a little moment forget the things that are small and wretched.
I am the Christmas Spirit.1

May we each discover anew the Christmas spirit—even the Spirit of Christ.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

 

*For Younger Children* Read or tell the following story: “Getting Ready for Christmas”  by President Dieter F Uchtdorf (taken from the December 2012 Friend)Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

As an old tradition, our family has always celebrated the Advent of Christmas. Starting on the fourth Sunday before Christmas, we would get together on Sunday afternoons, light wax candles on a pine Advent wreath, enjoy delicious homemade cookies, and read passages of scriptures that center on the Christ.

We read accounts of ancient prophets who yearned for the coming of the Messiah. We read scriptures that proclaim the wondrous story of His birth. Each week by singing beautiful Christmas songs and having a fun time together, our family tried to refocus on the true meaning of the season. I must admit that delicious hot chocolate, hot apple cider, and tasty homemade cookies helped a lot to catch the joyful feeling of the Christmas season!

While celebrating the Advent of Christmas is not part of all cultures around the globe, there is something we can learn from this widespread Christian tradition. Perhaps even this year we might carve from our busy schedules some time to study and reflect on the true meaning of Christmas—personally and as families.

When we prepare for Christmas by pondering its real meaning, we prepare to experience the Christ and His message. May I suggest three things we may want to study, ponder, and apply in this season of preparation.

First, rejoice in the birth of our Savior.

Second, ponder His influence in our lives today.

Third, look steadfastly for His coming.

I pray that each and every one of you will have a wonderful and merry Christmas season.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

 

*For Teenagers or Adults*  Read or summarize the following article “Rediscovering the Christmas Spirit” by President Monson (taken from December 2012 Ensign).  Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

Years ago as a young elder, I was called with others to a hospital in Salt Lake City to provide blessings for sick children. Upon entering, we noted a Christmas tree with its bright and friendly lights and saw carefully wrapped packages beneath its outstretched limbs. We then went through corridors where small boys and girls—some with plaster casts upon an arm or leg, others with ailments that perhaps could not be cured so readily—greeted us with smiling faces.

A young, desperately ill small boy called out to me, “What is your name?”

I told him my name, and he inquired, “Will you give me a blessing?”

The blessing was provided, and as we turned to leave his bedside, he said, “Thank you very much.”

We walked a few steps, and then I heard him call, “Oh, Brother Monson, merry Christmas to you.” Then a great smile flashed across his countenance.

That boy had the spirit of Christmas. The spirit of Christmas is something I hope all of us would have in our hearts and lives—not only at this particular season but also throughout the year.

When we have the spirit of Christmas, we remember Him whose birth we commemorate at this season of the year: “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:11).

In our day the spirit of giving gifts plays a large role in commemorating the Christmas season. I wonder if we might profit by asking ourselves, What gifts would the Lord have me give to Him or to others at this precious season of the year?

May I suggest that our Heavenly Father would want each of us to render to Him and to His Son the gift of obedience. I also feel that He would ask us to give of ourselves and not be selfish or greedy or quarrelsome, as His precious Son suggests in the Book of Mormon:

“Verily, verily I say unto you, he that hath the spirit of contention is not of me, but is of the devil, who … stirreth up the hearts of men to contend with anger, one with another.

“Behold, this is not my doctrine, to stir up the hearts of men with anger, one against another; but this is my doctrine, that such things should be done away” (3 Nephi 11:29–30).

In this marvelous dispensation of the fulness of times, our opportunities to love and give of ourselves are indeed limitless, but they are also perishable. Today there are hearts to gladden, kind words to say, deeds to be done, and souls to be saved.

One who had keen insight into the Christmas spirit wrote:

I am the Christmas Spirit—
I enter the home of poverty, causing palefaced children to open their eyes wide, in pleased wonder.
I cause the miser’s clutched hand to relax and thus paint a bright spot on his soul.
I cause the aged to renew their youth and to laugh in the old glad way.
I keep romance alive in the heart of childhood, and brighten sleep with dreams woven of magic.
I cause eager feet to climb dark stairways with filled baskets, leaving behind hearts amazed at the goodness of the world.
I cause the prodigal to pause a moment on his wild, wasteful way and send to anxious love some little token that releases glad tears—tears which wash away the hard lines of sorrow.
I enter dark prison cells, reminding scarred manhood of what might have been and pointing forward to good days yet to be.
I come softly into the still, white home of pain, and lips that are too weak to speak just tremble in silent, eloquent gratitude.
In a thousand ways, I cause the weary world to look up into the face of God, and for a little moment forget the things that are small and wretched.
I am the Christmas Spirit.1

May we each discover anew the Christmas spirit—even the Spirit of Christ.

Testify of the true meaning of Christmas.

FHE Treat

Treat

Microwave Caramels or White Chocolate Popcorn

Microwave Caramels

Yields 12-24 Caramels

Ingredient

1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup light Karo syrup
1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk

Instructions:

1. Combine all ingredients.

2. Cook 6 minutes, stirring every two minutes.

3. Stir and pour into lightly greased dish.

4. Let cool.

5. Cut, wrap in wax paper & store in air tight container. (Taken from Food)

White Chocolate Popcorn

Ingredients:

2 bags “natural” flavored microwave popcorn, popped, unpopped kernels removed
12 ounce bag white chocolate chips
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
3/4 cup M&M’s
Instructions:
1. Gently melt white chocolate chips with vegetable oil in microwave, stopping and stirring every 30 seconds or so, till smooth. Put popped popcorn in a very large mixing bowl. Pour melted white chocolate over popcorn, gently tossing. Quickly sprinkle with M&M’s and continue tossing till most of popcorn is coated.2. Spread popcorn onto large baking sheet and allow to cool completely. Break apart large pieces to serve.  Best on day made. (Taken from That Skinny Chick Can Bake)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1- Five Christmas Gifts activity page

President Monson said that we might want to think about which gifts the Lord would want us to give to Him or to others.

Circle the five children in the picture who are serving others. How are their actions gifts to Jesus?

2- Go Christmas Caroling as a family.

3- Make a Christmas countdown chain, with a scripture on each day. Here are some examples:

Jesus is born. (Luke 2:1–21)

Jesus calms the storm. (Mark 4:35–39)

Jesus feeds five thousand people. (Matthew 14:13–21)

Jesus teaches about the good Samaritan. (Luke 10:25–37)

Jesus heals the ten lepers. (Luke 17:11–19)

Jesus atones for our sins in Gethsemane. (Luke 22:41–45)

Jesus appears to the Nephites in the Americas after His Resurrection. (3 Nephi 11:8–17)

Jesus teaches the Nephites about the sacrament. (3 Nephi 18:1–12)

 

A Happy Family

4

Posted in Family, Love | Posted on 04-10-2012

Tags: , , ,

FHE Scripture

Scripture

John 13:34

34 A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another.

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

  A Happy Family - Primary Songbook #198 or Home Can Be a Heaven on Earth- Hymn #298

A Happy Family

1. I love mother*; she loves me.
We love daddy*, yes sirree;
He loves us, and so you see,
We are a happy family.

2. I love sister*; she loves me.
We love brother*, yes sirree;
He loves us, and so you see,
We are a happy family.

Home Can Be a Heaven on Earth

1. Home can be a heav’n on earth
When we are filled with love,
Bringing happiness and joy,
Rich blessings from above—
Warmth and kindness, charity,
Safety and security—
Making home a part of heaven,
Where we want to be.

2. Drawing fam’ly near each week,
We’ll keep love burning bright.
Serving Him with cheerful hearts,
We’ll grow in truth and light.
Parents teach and lead the way,
Children honor and obey,
Reaching for our home in heaven,
Where we want to stay.

3. Praying daily in our home,
We’ll feel His love divine;
Searching scriptures faithfully,
We’ll nourish heart and mind.
Singing hymns of thanks, we’ll say,
“Father, help us find the way
Leading to our home in heaven,
Where we long to stay.”

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For All Family Members* Read & discuss the article listed below (taken from the Oct First Presidency Message).  Watch the video belowTestify of the importance loving & forgiving one another so that we can have a happy family.

The great Russian author Leo Tolstoy began his novel Anna Karenina with these words: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”1 While I do not have Tolstoy’s certainty that happy families are all alike, I have discovered one thing that most have in common: they have a way of forgiving and forgetting the imperfections of others and of looking for the good.

Those in unhappy families, on the other hand, often find fault, hold grudges, and can’t seem to let go of past offenses.

“Yes, but …” begin those who are unhappy. “Yes, but you don’t know how badly she hurt me,” says one. “Yes, but you don’t know how terrible he is,” says another.

Perhaps both are right; perhaps neither.

There are many degrees of offense. There are many degrees of hurt. But what I have noticed is that often we justify our anger and satisfy our consciences by telling ourselves stories about the motives of others that condemn their actions as unforgivable and egoistic while, at the same time, lifting our own motives as pure and innocent.

The Prince’s Dog

There is an old Welsh story from the 13th century about a prince who returned home to find his dog with blood dripping down its face. The man rushed inside and, to his horror, saw that his baby boy was missing and his cradle overturned. In anger the prince pulled out his sword and killed his dog. Shortly thereafter, he heard the cry of his son—the babe was alive! By the infant’s side lay a dead wolf. The dog had, in reality, defended the prince’s baby from a murderous wolf.

Though this story is dramatic, it demonstrates a point. It opens the possibility that the story we tell ourselves about why others behave a certain way does not always agree with the facts—sometimes we don’t even want to know the facts. We would rather feel self-justified in our anger by holding onto our bitterness and resentment. Sometimes these grudges can last months or years. Sometimes they can last a lifetime.

A Family Divided

One father could not forgive his son for departing from the path he had been taught. The boy had friends the father did not approve of, and he did many things contrary to what his father thought he should do. This caused a rift between father and son, and as soon as the boy could, he left home and never returned. They rarely spoke again.

Did the father feel justified? Perhaps.

Did the son feel justified? Perhaps.

All I know is that this family was divided and unhappy because neither father nor son could forgive each other. They could not look past the bitter memories they had about each other. They filled their hearts with anger instead of love and forgiveness. Each robbed himself of the opportunity to influence the other’s life for good. The divide between them appeared so deep and so wide that each became a spiritual prisoner on his own emotional island.

Fortunately, our loving and wise Eternal Father in Heaven has provided the means to overcome this prideful gap. The great and infinite Atonement is the supreme act of forgiveness and reconciliation. Its magnitude is beyond my understanding, but I testify with all my heart and soul of its reality and ultimate power. The Savior offered Himself as ransom for our sins. Through Him we gain forgiveness.

No Family Is Perfect

None of us is without sin. Every one of us makes mistakes, including you and me. We have all been wounded. We all have wounded others.

It is through our Savior’s sacrifice that we can gain exaltation and eternal life. As we accept His ways and overcome our pride by softening our hearts, we can bring reconciliation and forgiveness into our families and our personal lives. God will help us to be more forgiving, to be more willing to walk the second mile, to be first to apologize even if something wasn’t our fault, to lay aside old grudges and nurture them no more. Thanks be to God, who gave His Only Begotten Son, and to the Son, who gave His life for us.

We can feel God’s love for us every day. Shouldn’t we be able to give a little more of ourselves to our fellowmen as taught in the beloved hymn“Because I Have Been Given Much”?2 The Lord has opened the door for us to be forgiven. Wouldn’t it be only right to put aside our own egotism and pride and begin to open that blessed door of forgiveness to those with whom we struggle—especially to all of our own family?

In the end, happiness does not spring from perfection but from applying divine principles, even in small steps. The First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles have declared: “Happiness in family life is most likely to be achieved when founded upon the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ. Successful marriages and families are established and maintained on principles of faith, prayer, repentance, forgiveness, respect, love, compassion, work, and wholesome recreational activities.”3

Forgiveness is positioned right in the middle of these simple truths, founded on our Heavenly Father’s plan of happiness. Because forgiveness connects principles, it connects people. It is a key, it opens locked doors, it is the beginning of an honest path, and it is one of our best hopes for a happy family.

May God help us to be a little more forgiving in our families, more forgiving of each other, and perhaps more forgiving even with ourselves. I pray that we may experience forgiveness as one wonderful way in which most happy families are alike.

Watch the following video:

Testify of the importance loving & forgiving one another so that we can have a happy family.

*For Younger Children* Read & discuss the scenarios listed below (taken from the Oct First Presidency Message suggestions). Watch the video below. Testify of the importance loving one another so that we can have a happy family.

President Uchtdorf teaches that we should forgive our family members. See how Joseph’s and Anna’s choices affect their family.

Joseph and his little sister, Anna, are playing together. Anna snatches Joseph’s toy away from him. What should Joseph do?

Joseph gets angry at Anna. Anna cries. Joseph’s mother disciplines him for fighting with his sister. Joseph is sorry that he made a poor choice.

Joseph forgives Anna and finds another toy to play with. They play together happily. Their mother is glad that Joseph was kind to his sister and kept peace in the family. Joseph feels happy for choosing to forgive.

Later, Joseph and Anna need to help their mother prepare dinner. Joseph doesn’t help. What should Anna do?

Anna complains to her mother. Anna argues about having to do the work alone. At dinner everyone is unhappy because of the arguing.

Anna forgives Joseph and helps with dinner. Their mother is grateful for Anna’s help. The family enjoys being together at dinner. Anna feels good that she chose to forgive.

How do your choices to forgive affect your family’s happiness?

Watch the following video:

We should love one another and spend time with one another.

Testify of the importance loving one another so that we can have a happy family.

*For Teenagers or Adults*  Read & discuss the article listed below (taken from the Oct First Presidency Message). Watch the video below. Testify of the importance loving & forgiving one another so that we can have a happy family.

The great Russian author Leo Tolstoy began his novel Anna Karenina with these words: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”1 While I do not have Tolstoy’s certainty that happy families are all alike, I have discovered one thing that most have in common: they have a way of forgiving and forgetting the imperfections of others and of looking for the good.

Those in unhappy families, on the other hand, often find fault, hold grudges, and can’t seem to let go of past offenses.

“Yes, but …” begin those who are unhappy. “Yes, but you don’t know how badly she hurt me,” says one. “Yes, but you don’t know how terrible he is,” says another.

Perhaps both are right; perhaps neither.

There are many degrees of offense. There are many degrees of hurt. But what I have noticed is that often we justify our anger and satisfy our consciences by telling ourselves stories about the motives of others that condemn their actions as unforgivable and egoistic while, at the same time, lifting our own motives as pure and innocent.

The Prince’s Dog

There is an old Welsh story from the 13th century about a prince who returned home to find his dog with blood dripping down its face. The man rushed inside and, to his horror, saw that his baby boy was missing and his cradle overturned. In anger the prince pulled out his sword and killed his dog. Shortly thereafter, he heard the cry of his son—the babe was alive! By the infant’s side lay a dead wolf. The dog had, in reality, defended the prince’s baby from a murderous wolf.

Though this story is dramatic, it demonstrates a point. It opens the possibility that the story we tell ourselves about why others behave a certain way does not always agree with the facts—sometimes we don’t even want to know the facts. We would rather feel self-justified in our anger by holding onto our bitterness and resentment. Sometimes these grudges can last months or years. Sometimes they can last a lifetime.

A Family Divided

One father could not forgive his son for departing from the path he had been taught. The boy had friends the father did not approve of, and he did many things contrary to what his father thought he should do. This caused a rift between father and son, and as soon as the boy could, he left home and never returned. They rarely spoke again.

Did the father feel justified? Perhaps.

Did the son feel justified? Perhaps.

All I know is that this family was divided and unhappy because neither father nor son could forgive each other. They could not look past the bitter memories they had about each other. They filled their hearts with anger instead of love and forgiveness. Each robbed himself of the opportunity to influence the other’s life for good. The divide between them appeared so deep and so wide that each became a spiritual prisoner on his own emotional island.

Fortunately, our loving and wise Eternal Father in Heaven has provided the means to overcome this prideful gap. The great and infinite Atonement is the supreme act of forgiveness and reconciliation. Its magnitude is beyond my understanding, but I testify with all my heart and soul of its reality and ultimate power. The Savior offered Himself as ransom for our sins. Through Him we gain forgiveness.

Prayer and Peace

One evening I argued with my mom and felt pretty bad. So I decided I would pray. Although I was in a bad mood and didn’t want to be “spiritual,” I knew praying would help me feel happier and less argumentative. After my mom left the room, I started my prayer. “Dear Heavenly Father, I’ve come to Thee tonight because …” No. I opened my eyes and unfolded my arms; that sounded awkward. I tried again. “Heavenly Father, I need …” That also sounded strange. I felt Satan urging me to give up my prayer of asking Heavenly Father for help.

Suddenly I had a prompting to say thank you! So I did, and thoughts started spilling from my mind of all the many things I could thank my Father in Heaven for. When I was done thanking Him, I discussed the problem at hand.

Afterward I felt a wonderful peace inside me, the warm spiritual feeling that I know our Heavenly Father and my parents love me and that I am a child of God. I was able to apologize to my mother and accept her apology.

No Family Is Perfect

In the end, happiness does not spring from perfection but from applying divine principles, even in small steps. The First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles have declared: “Happiness in family life is most likely to be achieved when founded upon the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ. Successful marriages and families are established and maintained on principles of faith, prayer, repentance, forgiveness, respect, love, compassion, work, and wholesome recreational activities.”3

Forgiveness is positioned right in the middle of these simple truths, founded on our Heavenly Father’s plan of happiness. Because forgiveness connects principles, it connects people. It is a key, it opens locked doors, it is the beginning of an honest path, and it is one of our best hopes for a happy family.

May God help us to be a little more forgiving in our families, more forgiving of each other, and perhaps more forgiving even with ourselves. I pray that we may experience forgiveness as one wonderful way in which most happy families are alike.

Watch the following video:

Testify of the importance loving & forgiving one another so that we can have a happy family.

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Banana Bread Bars or Brownie Ice Cream Sandwich

Banana Bread Bars

24 Servings

Ingredients

Banana Bread Bars:
1-1/2 c. sugar
1 c. sour cream
1/2 c. butter, softened
2 eggs
1-3/4 (3 or 4) ripe bananas, mashed
2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 c. all purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 c. chopped walnuts (optional)
Brown Butter Frosting:
1/2 c. butter
4 c. powdered sugar
1-1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
3 tbsp. milk

Instructions:

1. Heat oven to 375F.  Grease and flour 15×10-inch jelly roll pan.  For the bars, in a large bowl, beat together sugar, sour cream, butter, and eggs until creamy.  Blend in bananas and vanilla extract.  Add flour, baking soda, salt, and blend for 1 minute.  Stir in walnuts.

2.  Spread batter evenly into pan.  Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.
3.  Meanwhile, for frosting, heat butter in a large saucepan over medium heat until boiling.  Let the butter turn a delicate brown and remove from heat immediately.
4.  Add powdered sugar, vanilla extract and milk.  Whisk together until smooth (it should be thicker than a glaze but thinner than frosting).  Using a spatula, spread the brown butter frosting over the warm bars (the frosting will be easier to spread while the bars are still warm) (Taken from Life’s Simple Measures)

 Brownie Ice Cream Sandwich

16 Servings

Ingredients:

1 box (19.9 oz. each) brownie mix
3 ½ cups vanilla lowfat frozen yogurt
½ cup M&M’S® Brand Chocolate Candies
2 8-inch round cake pans
Wax paper
Instructions:

1. Prepare the cake pans by greasing them and lining the bottoms (not the sides) with wax paper.

2. Prepare brownie mix according to the package directions. Divide batter between the two prepared cake pans.
3. Bake according to the package directions. Remove and cool completely.
4. Run a small paring knife around the edges of each brownie, loosening it from the pan.
5. Invert one layer onto a cookie sheet, and spread vanilla ice cream on top, coming right to the edge (you can slightly soften the ice cream first).
6. Place the other brownie layer on top, and press gently to secure. Place in the freezer until firm, about 2 hours.
7. Just before serving, press M&M’S® Brand Chocolate Candies into the ice cream.
8. Cut into thin wedges and serve right away. (Taken from Bright Ideas)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1- Secret service.
(Write each family members name on a small piece of paper. Place the pieces of paper in a bowl. Have each family member draw out a name. Each person will do secret acts of service for the person who’s name they drew. Be sure to keep it a secret. *Help other younger children in the family*)

2- Love Circle
(Place a chair in the center of the room. Have a family member sit in the chair. Then go around the room and everyone will say something nice about the person in the chair. Take turns so that every family member gets a turn in the chair.)

3- Play Do you love your neighbor.

 

Being an Example

3

Posted in Love, Missionary Work, Uncategorized | Posted on 14-09-2012

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FHE Scripture

Scripture

1 Timothy 4:12

12 Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity.

 

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

  I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus - Primary Songbook #78 or  Lord, I Would Follow Thee- Hymn #220

I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus

1. I’m trying to be like Jesus;
I’m following in his ways.
I’m trying to love as he did, in all that I do and say.
At times I am tempted to make a wrong choice,
But I try to listen as the still small voice whispers,

2. I’m trying to love my neighbor;
I’m learning to serve my friends.
I watch for the day of gladness when Jesus will come again.
I try to remember the lessons he taught.
Then the Holy Spirit enters into my thoughts, saying:

Chorus
“Love one another as Jesus loves you.
Try to show kindness in all that you do.
Be gentle and loving in deed and in thought,
For these are the things Jesus taught.”

Lord, I Would Follow Thee

1. Savior, may I learn to love thee,
Walk the path that thou hast shown,
Pause to help and lift another,
Finding strength beyond my own.
Savior, may I learn to love thee—

[Chorus]
Lord, I would follow thee.

2. Who am I to judge another
When I walk imperfectly?
In the quiet heart is hidden
Sorrow that the eye can’t see.
Who am I to judge another?

3. I would be my brother’s keeper;
I would learn the healer’s art.
To the wounded and the weary
I would show a gentle heart.
I would be my brother’s keeper—

4. Savior, may I love my brother
As I know thou lovest me,
Find in thee my strength, my beacon,
For thy servant I would be.
Savior, may I love my brother—

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For All Family Members* Read or tell the story of Abinadi (Mosiah 11:20 – 13:25;  17:1-20). Discuss the story of Abinadi & how he was an example of the believers. Brainstorm ways we can be examples of the believers. Testify of the importance of being an example of the believers.

Read or tell the story of Abinadi (Mosiah 11:20 – 13:25; Mosiah 17:1-20).

How was Abinadi an example of the believers?

What things can we do to be an example of the believers?

Re-read 1 Timothy 4:12.

Testify of the importance of being an example of the believers.

*For Younger Children* Share different stories from “Take the Lead” (Sept 2012 Friend). Discuss ways we can be an example. Testify of the importance and simplicity of being an example.

Take the Lead cards

Share simple ideas of how we can be an example.

Testify of the importance & simplicity of being an example.

*For Teenagers or Adults* Watch the video below “Charity: An Example of the Believers“. Re-read 1 Timothy 4:12. Brainstorm ways we can be examples of the believers. Testify of the importance & simplicity of being an example of the believers.

Re-read 1 Timothy 4:12.

Brainstorm ways we can be examples of the believers and live a more Christlike life.

Testify of the simplicity & importance of being an example of the believers.

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Magic Cookie Bars or Goldfish Marshmallow Pops

Magic Cookie Bars

36 Servings

Ingredients

1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted
1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1 (14 ounce) can EAGLE BRAND® Sweetened Condensed Milk
2 cups semisweet chocolate morsels
1 1/3 cups flaked coconut
1 cup chopped nuts

Instructions:

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F (325 degrees for glass dish). Coat 13×9-inch baking pan with no-stick cooking spray.

2. Combine graham cracker crumbs and butter. Press into bottom of prepared pan. Pour sweetened condensed milk evenly over crumb mixture. Layer evenly with chocolate chips, coconut and nuts. Press down firmly with a fork.

3. Bake 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool. Cut into bars or diamonds. Store covered at room temperature. (Taken from All Recipes)

 Marshmallow Pops

20 Servings

Ingredients:

1 bag light blue chocolate melts (found in the baking aisle of most craft stores)
1 – 10.5 ounce bag large marshmallows
1 box graham cracker crumbs (I used Keebler brand)
1 – 6.6 ounce bag cheddar goldfish
Large white pearl nonpareils
20 lollipop sticks

Instructions:

1. Melt blue chocolate melts according to package. I recommend placing chocolate in a microwavable bowl and melting in 30 second increments, mixing in between. Do not over-melt or the chocolate will be difficult to work with.2. Place lollipop sticks in marshmallows. Dip marshmallows into the chocolate. Tip: Tap excess chocolate off the marshmallow before proceeding to step 3.

3. Before the chocolate dries, dip the bottom in graham cracker crumbs. Add a goldfish and 2 white pearl non pareils.

4. Allow to dry and then enjoy! If you are making this a day in advance, make sure to place your pops in an air tight container or cover with saran wrap so they don’t go stale. (Taken from See Vanessa Craft)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1- Take some of the treat to a neighbor or friend.

2- Do a secret service for someone in the neighborhood.

3- Play Indoor Foot Volleyball.